Visit to the Carpigiano Gelato University in Italy

As reported in our post from May 1, 2013, “Gelato University in Italy for International Students,” Carpigiani (the world leader in gelato machines) has opened a gelato university at their headquarters near Bologna, Italy

This is the headquarters of Carpigiani, the world’s biggest gelato machine. Next door are the and Museum of Gelato Culture and Technology.

People from around the world are anxious to attend this new university.

Now NPR reports on an actual visit to this delicious and unique university.

Click here for article

Learn to make gelato

Eat your way through school by starting with dessert!

Gelato University in Italy for International Students

Whether you are a passionate home-based gelato enthusiast or a professional pastry chef, these courses are designed to maximize your gelato-making talent.

Learn to make gelato

Eat your way through school by starting with dessert!

Learn from gelato masters  in Italy (classes are available in English) at courses that vary from one day to four weeks. You can study at the Gelato University in Italy (near Bologna in the Emilia Romagna region of central Italy), you can attend courses in a variety of countries or even online.

Carpigiani Gelato University is an international center of learning dedicated to training entrepreneurs who want to enter the gelato business or who already work with gelato and want to improve their abilities. Around 12,000 courses every year are donein our gelato school by top chefs.

 

Started by the manufacturers of the well-known Carpigiano professional gelato machines, university representatives state:

Indeed, our main goals are developing the art and science of gelato production, the comprehensive training of gelato entrepreneurs, and the promotion of Italian gelato as a natural and flavorful food suitable for all cultures.

For more information:
http://www.gelatouniversity.com/en/?langid=en&lng=en

Italy Introduces Green, Electric Quadricycle to Postal Fleet

Introducing the  Italian Postal Services mini-car with methane, carbon-free distribution, This project is part of  the participation in European environmental projects.MiniCarPostalService

I cannot wait to see these in the historic center of Florence when I’m there in May.  They are so cute!

Click here to read entire article from the Italian Post Headlines:

Another Way to Enjoy Wine: As Dessert!

Italian Wine for gelatin dessert

I love Italian wines and always have a glass with my dinners.  I also use Italian wines for cooking and giving dishes more depth.

Here, from L’Italo-Americano,  is yet another way to use Italian wines – gelatin desserts!

Click Here

Ordering an Espresso in Italy – Let me Count the Ways…

Any Italian will tell you where to find the best espresso in their town or village. They may even argue over their choices with families and friends (as each person has their own criteria and strong opinion)!

This is a passionate subject. Italians firmly believe that, no matter your status or means, you should always demand the best for yourself. This attitude is certainly evident when it comes to their favorite beverage, the thick and frothy caffé.

But it does not stop here: If you hang around a caffé for a couple of hours, you will get very confused over the many ways Italians order their favorite drink. I have thought of 10. Do you know of any others?

Un caffé “macchiato” (spotted): This is a request for an espresso with a quick shot of frothy milk (in a much smaller amount than that found in a cappuccino). Non-Italians beware: this is a very strong, small shot and true espresso. If you are used to the foreign versions of espresso, this may not be for you. You may want to order one of the versions listed below instead.

2. Un caffé “macchiato” (spotted): This is a request for an espresso with a quick shot of frothy milk (in a much smaller amount than that found in a cappuccino).

3. Un caffé “corretto” (corrected): This is more popular than you may think, especially among men. It is a request to “correct” the coffee with one’s favorite aquavit or liquor of choice, such as “corretto al rum, corretto al cognac, corretto al …” (you fill in the blanks).

4. Un caffé “basso” (low): You are asking for a version of espresso that sits low in the cup (less water) and a stronger result.

5. Un caffé” ristretto” (narrow or condensed): This is a condensed version of espresso with less water, essentially the same as a caffé basso (above).

6. Un caffé alto (high): This version must appear higher in the cup than a regular espresso hence entails more water than a normal single espresso and is less strong.

7. Un caffé lungo (long): This is basically the same as a Un caffé alto (above).

8. Un caffé doppio (double): This is similar to what you can order in the U.S. It is the equivalent of two doses of espresso in one cup. A few of these double whammies and you will walk and talk a lot faster.

9. Un caffé al vetro (in glass): You are ordering your espresso in a glass rather than in a ceramic tazzina (espresso cup).

10. Un caffé in tazza grande (in a large cup): You prefer your tiny shot of coffee in a large cup. This is very trendy at the moment.

Ciao a tutti, Serenella

 

Italy emulates U.S. – Italians getting fatter

Native Italian and fitness expert Paul Frediani recently returned from his annual trip to Italy. Paul is passionate about Italy and the Italian lifestyle. While he always loves the precious time spent in his native village of Bozzano in Tuscany, Paul is bothered by a disturbing trend. Are the Italians emulating some of America’s negative habits?

Here are Paul’s thoughts:

“Tutto il mondo é un paese” – an old Italian saying meaning “the world is a village” – is certainly true when it comes to the alarming increase in the rate of obesity in western society today. The Italians are no exception. The obesity levels in Italy are up 25% since 1994. Italian obesity is at 9%, while America’s is at 30% but the Italians are gaining fast. It’s no wonder Fiat bought Chrysler. It was a strategic move: At the rate of their fast expanding waistline Italians will no longer be able to fit into their Cinquecentos. I was shocked and baffled by what I saw in Italy this past year. Young teenage girls with big bellies hanging over their waistline, men so fat their Armani’s are busting at the seams. Although I have seen the slow but gradual weight gain of the Italian population over the years, this last trip simply “blew my mind”.

Read more

Forbes Reports: Lucca, Tuscany is one of Europe’s most Idyllic Places To Live

A historic city within a city, it’s difficult to find a house within the old, Renaissance walls of Lucca, but apartments are more plentiful. Its handsome centro storico (or historical center) is little changed since local son Giaccomo Puccini served as church choir master, according to Schultz. The shaded three-mile path atop the city walls is a favorite bike ride or passaggiata for the lucchesi, she adds, and Lucca is the epicenter for Tuscany’s world-class olive oil, so you know food and wine are revered here. Living outside the city, in the surrounding hillsides, is just as idyllic. “To live in the city in the winter and come into the hills in thesummer, that is heaven on earth,” says local Realtor Sarita Vincent.

forbes1

Click here to read the full article.

 

A dog’s life in Lucca, Italy

In 2008, Italy was named as one of the top 5 retirement destinations for U.S. citizens by International Living. My friend and client Marlene recently moved to Lucca (Tuscany), Italy. Marlene often lets me know how she is adjusting.  A very important concern for Marlene was for her beloved pets. How would they adjust?  How would they be treated? Below are Marlene’s comments on life in Italy with her two miniature dachsunds.

One of the best decisions I could have made when moving to Italy last year was to bring my adorable miniature dachshunds with me. Ruby and Ginger, ages 4 and 3 respectively, are little red cuties who attract lots of attention here. They are referred to as Bassoto or “short legs.” Because mine are miniature, they are called bassotini.

Read more

Fresh made pizza from a vending machine made in Italy

How would you like to insert 4 or 5 dollars into a machine then watch it prepare dough from scratch, add fresh ingredients and emit a hot, freshly-baked pizza in under 3 minutes? This is the concept behind the “Let’s Pizza” vending machine.

The machine was invented by Claudio Torghele, 56. This Italian entrepreneur sold pizza dough in California and was impressed by the popularity of pizza in the U.S.

According to the New York Times:

Read more

A dog’s life in Lucca, Italy

In 2008, Italy was named as one of the top 5 retirement destinations for U.S. citizens by International Living. My friend and client Marlene recently moved to Lucca (Tuscany), Italy. Marlene often lets me know how she is adjusting.  A very important concern for Marlene was for her beloved pets. How would they adjust?  How would they be treated? Below are Marlene’s comments on life in Italy with her two miniature dachsunds.

One of the best decisions I could have made when moving to Italy last year was to bring my adorable miniature dachshunds with me. Ruby and Ginger, ages 4 and 3 respectively, are little red cuties who attract lots of attention here. They are referred to as Bassoto or “short legs.” Because mine are miniature, they are called bassotini.
When I take the girls out for their walks, I get stopped by at least half the people I see so they can pet them, talk to them or just call them “belline” (pretty little girls). The girls are very friendly, so this helps tremendously. Many of the folks I see on a daily basis make a beeline for the girls and I am just the one who happens to be holding their leashes. Ruby and Ginger have many, many friends here who don’t mind in the least if they jump on them and give them kisses. I have tried in vain to teach them not to jump on people, but here it’s encouraged.

Read more

Next Page »